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ANIS2007

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Not only did the traditional Acts like the Indian Act undermined the achievements of the Anishinabe during that period, but the influence of the Act still exists today while new others have been established. The new establishments are in a way hindering the Anishinabe’s expectations towards achieving a society where equity among all is considered. These current actions include C51 Bill that impacts both the Anishinabe as well as non-Anishinabe social movements. The paper therefore examines the achievements and what the Anishinabe expects to achieve while also considering traditional tools of oppression and current government actions.
The colonial rules perpetuated ideas across the colonized nations to ensure a continuous discrimination towards a certain group or groups of individuals. The Indian Act is among the major discriminatory ideas that led to the discrimination of Aboriginal women in Canada all through since its introduction. The discrimination is still evidenced today within various means that in return continue to hinder the goal of Anishinabe’s (Smith,&nbsp.2008). The Indian Act continues to normalize as well as perpetuate gender discrimination in three broad areas through regulation of the family, political exclusion as well as the reserve system together with exclusion as a result of geographic coverage. The Indian Act is thus essential in understanding the historical as well as the current socio-political movements in Canada. Since its creation in 1876 by the federal government, The Indian Act focused on presenting a colonial idea that depicted men as society leaders owing to their household leadership roles portraying women as their husbands’ dependants. The Act denied women against possessing material property unless for widows who were allowed such possession upon the death of the husband under the reverse system. It is however important to note that the widow never inherited