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A Look into Judith Ortiz Cofers Quinceaera

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This is due to the fact that the celebrant’s mother and all of her previous ancestors were also able to celebrate the occasion, and they also had a chance to think about the possible things that could happen to them after they reach adulthood. It is also a known fact that the younger generation seems to think ahead of the older generation, which is why the younger ones are usually a lot smarter than the older ones, although not necessarily wiser. This poem is divided into several parts. The first sentence may be categorized as the realization of the end of childhood. It goes as: My dolls have been put away like dead children in a chest I will carry with me when I marry (Cofer 50). Based on the tone of the passage, the dolls may represent the childhood of the celebrant, which she currently is not living in anymore due to being in the awkward stage of neither a child nor an adult. The next passage describes the excitement of experiencing the celebration, which can be read in the following passage: I reach under my skirt to feel a satin slip bought for this day (Cofer 50). With the coming of age also come the additional responsibilities of being an adult, as described by the passage: My hair has been nailed back with my mother’s black hairpins into my skull. Her hands stretched my eyes wide open as she twisted braids into a tight circle at the nape of my neck (Cofer 50). The description of as to how the braid was done by the celebrant’s mother can imply that she is forcing the responsibilities of being an adult to her daughter, and that she is opening the daughter’s eyes in order for her to become fully aware of her actions as… This poem is divided into several parts. The first sentence may be categorized as the realization of the end of childhood. It goes as: My dolls have been put away like dead children in a chest I will carry with me when I marry. Based on the tone of the passage, the dolls may represent the childhood of the celebrant, which she currently is not living in anymore due to being in the awkward stage of neither a child nor an adult. The next passage describes the excitement of experiencing the celebration, which can be read in the following passage: I reach under my skirt to feel a satin slip bought for this day. With the coming of age also come the additional responsibilities of being an adult, as described by the passage: My hair has been nailed back with my mother’s black hairpins into my skull. Her hands stretched my eyes wide open as she twisted braids into a tight circle at the nape of my neck. The description of as to how the braid was done by the celebrant’s mother can imply that she is forcing the responsibilities of being an adult to her daughter, and that she is opening the daughter’s eyes in order for her to become fully aware of her actions as well as things to come.